Antarctica expeditioners take icy plunge for winter solstice

This week, Expedition 33 of the New Horizons mission made history. At 5:52 p.m. EST (1852 GMT) on Jan. 14, 1999, the spacecraft, the most powerful in history, made the final “solar orbit” of Saturn and flew at an altitude of 11,400 miles (19,500 kilometers). The launch lasted 11 minutes 42 seconds — three minutes less than NASA’s two previous space launches, and two minutes less than the time taken for the two last Saturn orbits, in 1986 and 1989.

In comparison, the previous seven days of New Horizons mission science activities — which were coordinated with the Lunar Orbiter Mission Mission, NASA’s planned orbiter spacecraft — lasted 15 minutes 54 seconds.

“By the time you turn the camera on New Horizons, we’re on the final descent into the outer core, which is about 2,500 miles [3,000 kilometers] above the horizon, and we’re probably there for a while,” Ken Herkenhoff, New Horizons’ mission manager from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, told NASA on Feb. 13. “It’s a dramatic last ap더킹카지노proach, a total closing of a journey that began six months earlier.”

But that final, somber descent will take place this Wednesday, Feb. 15, according to a NASA press release. The New Horizons spacecraft will plunge through our sun’s atmosphere and burn up in a fireball. [See images of the solar system in real-time during a mission briefing]

New Horizons is an open platform, and so it’s possible to explore the deep space in ways we haven’t yet experienced before. During the probe’s closest approach to Saturn, it passed by Venus on Feb. 12 — the closest planetary body ever in our solar system — and the moon Rhea in June. Those two events, along with other close approaches to other planets, have given us a바카라 much better idea of what our own Earth looks like.

The New Horizons probe’바카라사이트s New Horizons mission is an open platform, and so it’s possible to explore the deep space in ways we haven’t yet experienced before. During the probe’s closest approach to Saturn, it passed by Venus on Feb. 12 — the closest planetary body ever in our solar system. During its closest approach to the sun, it passed by Venus on Feb. 12 — the closest planetary body ever in our solar system. See the stunning images of our planet from the high-resolution mapping instrument, MAVEN. Credit: by NASA/